Tuesday marks 100 years since women were guaranteed the right to vote in US

In this Aug. 19, 1920 photo made available by the Library of Congress, Alice Paul, chair of the...
In this Aug. 19, 1920 photo made available by the Library of Congress, Alice Paul, chair of the National Woman's Party, unfurls a banner after the ratification of the 19th Amendment, from a balcony at the NWP's headquarters in Washington.(The Crowley Company/Library of Congress via AP)
Published: Aug. 18, 2020 at 7:51 AM CDT
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(CNN) – Tuesday marks a very special and important anniversary in the United States: 100 years since women got the right to vote.

The 19th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution was ratified on Aug. 18, 1920.

The House of Representatives and Senate had approved the amendment the previous year, sending it to the states for ratification.

Three-fourths of states had to ratify it. The last one that needed to do so was Tennessee, making the amendment part of the Constitution.

The push for women’s suffrage had been underway for years, starting in the mid-19th century.

For decades, several generations of women’s suffrage advocates marched, lobbied and practiced civil disobedience to get women the right to vote.

Their long, brave fight for change culminated in the drafting, passage and ratification of the 19th Amendment.

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