The Aftermath of Superstorm Sandy

By: Associated Press Email
By: Associated Press Email

President Barack Obama has declared a major disaster in New York and Long Island.

The declaration makes federal funding available to people in the area. It bore the brunt of the sea surge from a superstorm that hit the East Coast on Monday.

The National Hurricane Center said that as of 5 a.m. today, the storm was moving westward across Pennsylvania and was centered about 90 miles west of Philadelphia.

It lost its hurricane status on Monday and is now considered an extratropical cyclone. It has left more than 7.5 million people without power.

It is expected to move into western New York on Tuesday night and move into Canada on Wednesday.



At least 16 U.S. deaths are now being blamed on the superstorm that's pummeling the East Coast.

One person died after a replica of the 18th-century sailing ship HMS Bounty that was built for the 1962 Marlon Brando movie "Mutiny on the Bounty," went down in the storm off North Carolina. Fourteen other crew members were rescued by helicopter Monday. The ship's captain is still missing.

In New York City, Superstorm Sandy flooded tunnels, subway stations and the electrical system that powers Wall Street. Stock trading will be closed for a second day today.

In the borough of Queens, a fire in a flooded neighborhood has destroyed at least 50 homes.

An estimated 6.2 million homes and businesses across the East are without power.

Heavy rain and further flooding remain major threats for the next couple of days as Sandy makes its way into Pennsylvania and up into New York State.



Hundreds of people are being evacuated after a levee broke in a northern New Jersey town early today.

Bergen County executive chief of staff Jeanne Baratta tells The Record newspaper the entire town of Moonachie is under water and as many as 1,000 people could need to be evacuated.

Baratta says people in a trailer park have had to climb on the roofs of their trailers to await rescue.

There are no reports of injuries or deaths.



The nation's oldest nuclear power plant is on alert after waters from a colossal storm reached high levels.

Oyster Creek in Lacey Township, N.J., was already offline for regular maintenance before Sandy, a superstorm downgraded Monday night from a hurricane, slammed the East Coast.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission says an "unusual event" was declared around 7 p.m. when water reached a high level. The situation was upgraded less than two hours later to an "alert," the second-lowest in a four-tiered warning system.

Federal officials say all nuclear plants are still in safe condition. They say water levels near Oyster Creek, which is along the Atlantic Ocean, will likely recede within a few hours.

Oyster Creek went online in 1969 and provides 9 percent of New Jersey's electricity.


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