Will Your College Kids’ Eating Habits Keep Them from Graduating?

By: News and Experts Email
By: News and Experts Email

Parents sending their children off to college for the first time typically have prepared years in advance for the big occasion. And since tuition rates continue to increase, parents are, more than ever, focused on having their child be successful and graduate, says David Porter, founder of a firm that designs campus wide dining programs and dining halls at colleges throughout North America, and author of “The Porter Principles: Retain & Recruit Students & Alumni, Save Millions on Dining and Stop Letting Food Service Contractors Eat Your Lunch”

“The average cost for an in-state public college for the 2012–2013 academic year is $22,261, and a moderate budget at a private college averaged $43,289,” says Porter, who has worked with the University of Georgia, University of New Hampshire, Ferris State University, George Mason University and the University of Richmond, among others. “While many American families have seen a sharp decline in their household income, higher education for their children is still a top priority.”

So, what might parents be overlooking when trying to ensure their child starts off a career with a college degree? It’s the school’s dining program and the role it plays in campus life, including the location(s), facilities, the menu, meal plans, hours, operating days and more, Porter says.

“It can and will be the most powerful aspect of day to day life for your son or daughter to connect to their class, make friends, see and be seen and connect to the school,” he says. “The sooner they connect to one another, the more likely they are to return as sophomores and eventually graduate.”

Social architecture, he explains, is the conscious design of an environment to encourage social behaviors that lead toward a goal -- in this case, solidifying college students’ connection to one another, and a commitment to their school, through dining.

“Social architecture is a catalyst for students to connect, make friends and be social; it’s crucial to helping students connect with their school and develop bonds with other students, which are both critical to student success,” he says. “Students who live and dine on campus tend to have higher GPA’s and are more likely to graduate.”

A meticulously planned, student-focused and socially rich dining program on a campus can help a student graduate.


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